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Edited by Douglas W. Woods, John C. Piacentini and John T. Walkup. Foreword by Peter Hollenbeck

Treating Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders

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Catalog No. 24617Grounded in a comprehensive model of Tourette syndrome (TS) and related disorders, this state-of-the-art volume provides a multidisciplinary framework for assessment and treatment. Leading authorities present the latest knowledge on the neurobehavioral underpinnings of TS, its clinical presentation, and how to distinguish it from frequently encountered co-occurring disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Strategies for managing symptoms and providing effective support to children and families are thoroughly detailed, with an emphasis on integrating medication and psychosocial therapies. Several chapters also address clinical work with adults with TS. User friendly and practical, the book includes three reproducible assessment tools.

Douglas W. Woods, PhD, is Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology and Director of Clinical Training at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

John C. Piacentini, PhD, is professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences in the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles. He is the chair of the Tourette Syndrome Association Behavioral Sciences Consortium and a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.

John T. Walkup, MD, is associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

Contributors include:

Ulrike Buhlmann, PhD, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinic and Research Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital

Susanna Chang, PhD, UCLA Child OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program

Susan Conners, MEd, Tourette Syndrome Association

Laura Cook, BA, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinic and Research Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital

Thilo Deckersbach, PhD, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinic and Research Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital

Christopher A. Flessner, MS, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,

Golda S. Ginsburg, PhD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Joyce N. Harrison, MD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Michael B. Himle, MS, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Hayden O. Kepley, PhD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Robert A. King, MD, Yale Child Study Center

Julie Newman Kingery, PhD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Jana Leary, MD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Brook A. Marcks, MS, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Amanda J. Pearlman, BA, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

Tara S. Peris, PhD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

Alan L. Peterson, PhD, Behavioral Wellness Center for Clinical Trials, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas at San Antonio

John C. Piacentini, PhD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA

Tyler Reimschisel, MD, Department of Pediatric and Developmental Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine

Lawrence Scahill, PhD, Yale Child Study Center

Benjamin Schneider, MS, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Harvey S. Singer, MD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Denis G. Sukhodolsky, PhD, Yale Child Study Center

John T. Walkup, MD, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Sabine Wilhelm, PhD, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Clinic and Research Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital

Douglas W. Woods, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,

"Since the 1970's, Tourette syndrome (TS) increasingly has been freed from moral, mystical, characterological, and psychopathological perspectives on evaluation and treatment; the prevailing perspective is now neurological and behavioral. The result of this epistemological change has been a quantum leap in all areas of empirically derived understanding of TS, especially in the area of treatment. There is no cure for TS, but for those who seek to manage symptoms effectively and to come as close to a cure as is humanly possible, I recommend setting aside abundant study time to spend with this excellent book."--Patrick C. Friman, PhD, Director, Girls and Boys Town Outpatient Behavioral Pediatrics; and Department of Pediatrics, University of Nebraska School of Medicine

 

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