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Norman Doidge

The Brain That Changes Itself

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Catalog No. 27335

An astonishing new science called "neuroplasticity" is overthrowing the centuries-old notion that the human brain is immutable.

In this revolutionary look at the brain, psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Norman Doidge, MD, provides an introduction to both the brilliant scientists championing neuroplasticity and the people whose lives they've transformed. From stroke patients learning to speak again to the remarkable case of a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, The Brain That Changes Itself will permanently alter the way we look at our brains, human nature, and human potential. "For years the doctrine of neuroscientists has been that the brain is a machine: break a part and you lose that function permanently. But more and more evidence is turning up to show that the brain can rewire itself, even in the face of catastrophic trauma.... Scientists have taught a woman with damaged inner ears, who for five years had had "a sense of perpetual falling," to regain her sense of balance with a sensor on her tongue; and a stroke victim to recover the ability to walk although 97% of the nerves from the cerebral cortex to the spine were destroyed.

With detailed case studies reminiscent of Oliver Sacks, combined with extensive interviews with lead researchers, Doidge, a research psychiatrist and psychoanalyst at Columbia and the University of Toronto, slowly turns everything we thought we knew about the brain upside down. He is, perhaps, overenthusiastic about the possibilities, believing that this new science can f every neurological problem, from learning disabilities to blindness. But Doidge writes interestingly and engagingly about some of the least understood marvels of the brain."--Publishers Weekly

"Mind-bending, miracle-making, reality-busting stuff with implications for all human beings."--The New York Times

427 pages. 2007


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