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John Piacentini, Audra Langley and Tami Roblek

Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Childhood OCD

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Catalog No. 26470

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) affects an estimated 2% of children in the United States and can cause considerable anxiety.

OCD is characterized by a pattern of rituals (or compulsions) and obsessive thinking. Common obsessions among children and teens include a fear of dirt or germs, a need for symmetry, order, and precision, and a fear of illness or harm coming to oneself or relatives. Common compulsions include grooming, repeating, and cleaning rituals. These obsessions and compulsions can severely interfere with daily functioning and are a source of significant distress. Without adequate treatment, the quality of life for youths and families dealing with OCD often suffers.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has shown to be effective in the treatment of childhood OCD. This therapist guide outlines a 12-session CBT-based treatment for OCD that benefits not only children and adolescents, but their families as well. Each session incorporates a family therapy component in addition to individual treatment for the child. It is a combined approach program that educates the child and family about OCD in order to reduce negative feelings of guilt and blame and to normalize family functioning. This manual also provides guidelines for conducting both imaginal and in vivo exposures; techniques at the core of helping children reduce their anxiety. For use with children ages 8 17, this book is an indispensable resource for clinicians helping children and their families cope with OCD.

John Piacentini, PhD, ABPP, is professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences; director of the Child OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program; and Chief of Child Psychology in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. He received his PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Georgia and completed postdoctoral training at the New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University, where he spent the next seven years as a faculty member in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Dr. Piacentini moved to UCLA in 1995 and founded the UCLA Child OCD program.

Audra Langley, PhD, is an assistant clinical professor in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience, where she works within the UCLA Child OCD, Anxiety, and Tic Disorders Program. Dr. Langley is also the director of training for the LAUSD/UCLA/RAND Trauma Services Adaptation Center as part of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network. Dr. Langley is a researcher and clinician who specializes in cognitive"behavioral treatment for youth with anxiety disorders. She received her PhD in Clinical Child Psychology from Virginia Tech and went on to specialize in CBT with children and adolescents during her internship at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. She was the recipient of an NIMH-funded National Research Service Award to further her postdoctoral research training in the clinical evaluation of evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders.

Tami Roblek, PhD, received her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Louisville and completed her internship at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute, where she specialized in child and adolescent anxiety disorders. For her postdoctoral training, she was the recipient of an NIMH-funded National Research Service Award focused on family environmental factors associated with OCD.

"...[O]utlines a practical, well-researched approach to treating childhood OCD. The authors have taken the complexity out of this disorder and presented the material in a kid-friendly/therapist-friendly format...Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Childhood OCD proves practical, effective, and cost-contained."--PsycCritiques

144 pages. 2007

 

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